Recording the Use of Records of Practice over time in Mathematics Teacher Education

 

Fall 2005

*********

Novices Using Records of Accomplished Practice:

Two Cycles of Activity that address course & programmatic objectives



Cycle 1: Weeks 2-3

We meet Mary Hurley, an accomplished teacher 4th/5th grade teacher for the first time while she conducts a conventional routine in mathematics instruction - the Warm Up. Noteworthy is that while both the instructional task and the mathematics are routine, Mary's teaching is not reductive. She pushes for high levels of participation, student autonomy and interdependence, student understanding, and student explanation throughout. The teacher education students use this visit to practice observing in a classroom, focusing on discourse, mathematics, routines, and how the teacher handles praise/critique, as well as right/wrong answers.

To hear me explain in greater detail what the virtual observation affords in terms of opportunities for pre-service teacher learning, in contrast to their observations of their mentor teacher in their field placement, click here.

To view the video of Mary Hurley teaching the Warm Up, click here.


Key ideas from readings and classwork
Key ideas from readings and classwork

Why is discourse important? 
Click above for an audio explanation of why discourse is fundamental in mathematics instruction

Click here to download a plug-in.

Resource:

5 Productive Talk Moves from Classroom Discussion: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn Grades 1-6 by Suzanne Chapin, Catherine O'Connor, & Nancy Canavan Anderson


Click here to view the assignment
Click here to view the assignment

Homework Assignment

Pre-Service Teachers conduct a Virtual Observation of Mary Hurley's Warm Up & Debrief Lesson

They complete this assignment individually as homework and it is discussed in class the following week. In addition to addressing course objectives regarding classroom routines and discourse practices, this assignment addresses departmental objectives by helping students learn to conduct a classroom observation using our protocol.


 
Click here

Small Group Talk

Having completed their observation at home during the previous week, students warm up for the discussion of Math, Class Routines, Classroom Talk, and Being Right & Prasie by revisiting their obsevations in small groups.



Whole Group Discussion

This conversation began with a "whip" in which each student in turn needed to share one thing that they observed in the lesson that seemed noteworthy. While they talked, four students worked to categorize these observations according to our four foci: math content, classroom routines, math talk, and how the teacher handles praise/critique and right/wrong answers. After all of the class' observations were recorded, we then discussed which of these might support children in learning mathematics and how. Three elements emerged for the class as salient factors: Peer Interactions, Teacher Questioning, and Teacher Stance.

Click here to see the in-class Whole Class Discussion of the Math Content, the Classroom Routines, the Math Talk, and how the teacher handles Praise/Critique and Right/Wrong answers and related artifacts. Or, to focus on a specific element, click on that highlighted word above.



Cycle 2: Weeks 7-8

We revisit Mary Hurley's class to see her take on more "adventurous teaching." In this lesson she engages her 4th grade students in a non-routine mathematics task known as the Horse Problem. In this example, there is an emphasis on multiple solution paths, logical reasoning, student thinking, representations of student thinking, group work, listening to peers, teacher questioning, and student presentations. The teacher education students use this vist to hone their own skills in listening to students's ideas, asking probing questions, and lesson planning.

To view the video of Mary Hurley teaching the Horse Problem, click here.



Key ideas from readings and classwork


Click here to view the assignment
Click here to view the assignment

Homework Assignment

Pre-Service Teacher conduct a Virtual Observation of Mary Hurley's Horse Problem

They complete this assigned obseration individually as homework and it is discussed in class the following week. In addition to addressing course objectives regarding student thinking and teacher questioning, this assighment addresses departmental objectives by helping students learn to create a lesson plan using our protocol.



Small Group Talk

Students began their small group discussion by talking about the two foci of their observation of Mary Hurley's "Horse Problem" lesson: Student Thinking and Teacher Questioning. After about 15 minutes, the small groups were asked to focus on specific features of the lesson plans that they recreated, based on their observations.


 

Divving up the Lesson Planning

After discussing their observations of student thinking and teacher questioning, the class shifted their focus to discuss planning. A blank copy of our department's lesson plan form was distributed to groups of students. Each small group was asked to discuss and record specific components of the lesson plan. Their work would be the basis of our whole class discussion on elements of lesson planning.



Whole Class Discussion

During the whole class discussion, each group presented their ideas for their assigned elements of the plan and then other members of the class contributed their ideas. We used the specifics of this particular lesson -- a word problem-based task -- to discuss general principles of lesson planning for elementary mathematics.




This electronic portfolio was created using the KEEP Toolkit™, developed at the
Knowledge Media Lab of The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.
Terms of Use - Privacy Policy